deaconjohn1987:

I always and still do, prayed to St. Joseph for my marriage, especially to be a good father and husband. We were married 52 years, then Marianne passed on to the Lord. I miss her but know I will see her again in heaven! :-)

Originally posted on Faith in our Families:

Zelie & Louis Martin

When I heard the relics of Louis and Zelie Martin were coming to the UK I immediately knew I had to go visit them. Their youngest daughter – St Therese of Lisieux was the one who guided me into Carmel. She has become one of my best friends (yes – some of my best friends are actually dead ;) ) and to be able to ‘meet’ her parents was a very special honour for me as a secular Carmelite. They had 9 children, 4 of whom tragically died in childhood. They were married for 19 years until Zelie died from breast cancer when little Therese was just 4 years old.

Their relics were on display at Portsmouth cathedral UK. Bishop Egan said Mass and gave a superb homily reminding us all that no man has the authority to change Christ’s teaching on marriage.

There was also time for quiet reflection. And…

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SCRIPTURE COMMENTARY #513

Posted: May 23, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

 

And going out, Jesus went, according to his custom, to the Mount of Olives. And his disciples also followed him. And when he was come to the place, he said to them: “Pray, lest ye enter into temptation.” And he was withdrawn away from them a stone’s cast. And kneeling down, he prayed. Saying: “Father, if thou wilt, remove this chalice from me: but yet not my will, but thine be done.” And there appeared to him an angel from heaven, strengthening him. And being in an agony, he prayed the longer. And his sweat became as drops of blood, trickling down upon the ground. And when he rose up from prayer and was come to the disciples, he found them sleeping for sorrow. And he said to them: “Why sleep you? Arise: pray: lest you enter into temptation.” (Luke 22:39-46)

THE QUALITIES OF PRAYER: Our Blessed Lord’s example teaches us also how we ought to pray. In the Garden of Gethsemani He prayed with devotion, — humility, — confidence, — submission to God’s will, — and perseverance: 1. with devotion; for He prayed from the very bottom of His Heart, and retired a little way from His apostles so that He might pray undisturbed; 2. with exterior and interior humility; for He fell on His Face, humbling Himself in the dust before the majesty of His Eternal Father; 3. with confidence; for He began His prayer with the loving words: “My Father”; 4. with submission to the will of God; for He left the granting of His petition entirely in the Hands of His heavenly Father: “Not as I will,” said He, “but as Thou wilt”; 5. with perseverance; for He said the same prayer over and over again. Even though He received no visible answer to His petition, He did not leave off praying, but rather “prayed the longer.”

[From ‘A Practical Commentary on Holy Scripture’ by Bishop Knecht, D.D.]
(1899 Douay-Rheims Bible)

“Pentecost is at work”: a great day in Brooklyn, as 19 new deacons are ordained.

Congrats from this old (27 years) deacon!!!

It was a glorious Spring day—and a moment of renewal for the Diocese of Brooklyn. On the day before Pentecost, 19 men were ordained deacons by Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio at the Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph. The church was packed with family, friends, religious, priests and deacons. As the bishop reminded us in his homily: “Pentecost is at work.” And how.

You can read more about the new deacon here: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/deaconsbench/

Sketch by Albrect Durer 1471 – 1528

 

And going out, Jesus went, according to his custom, to the Mount of Olives. And his disciples also followed him. And when he was come to the place, he said to them: “Pray, lest ye enter into temptation.” And he was withdrawn away from them a stone’s cast. And kneeling down, he prayed. Saying: “Father, if thou wilt, remove this chalice from me: but yet not my will, but thine be done.” And there appeared to him an angel from heaven, strengthening him. And being in an agony, he prayed the longer. And his sweat became as drops of blood, trickling down upon the ground. And when he rose up from prayer and was come to the disciples, he found them sleeping for sorrow. And he said to them: “Why sleep you? Arise: pray: lest you enter into temptation.” (Luke 22:39-46)

HOW TO BEAR SUFFERING: Look at our dear Lord, suffering such agony of soul for love of us! There He lies, with His Face on the ground, groaning in spirit and trembling in His agony. Around Him is the darkness of night, and within His Heart unspeakable woe. He is alone. His disciples are asleep, and nowhere can He find consolation! Now what did Jesus do in this time of extreme affliction and abandonment? He prayed to His heavenly Father, and resigned Himself entirely to His will. Thus should we do. If we are in grief, or fear, or need, we ought to turn to God, from whom alone we can obtain comfort and help, and humbly submit ourselves to His holy will.

[From ‘A Practical Commentary on Holy Scripture’ by Bishop Knecht, D.D.]
(1899 Douay-Rheims Bible)

English: Prayer on the Mount of Olives

English: Prayer on the Mount of Olives (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Great Father Grump

Posted: May 22, 2015 in Uncategorized

In my 27 years as a deacon, I’ve served a few Fr. Grump’s, but also a few Fr. Huggy’s. I think I liked the grumpy ones better! :-)

Read this article by clicking the link below and keep smiling!

FROM THE ARCHIVES OF NEW OXFORD REVIEW

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Father helped us learn that we don’t go to Mass because the priest is virtuous, and we don’t avoid the sacraments if a pastor is vicious. It’s not about him.

Read all about it…

 
The long-time pastor of my childhood church maintained a relationship of mutual contempt with his parishioners. Or so it seemed to me, as I listened to his sermons berating the congregation for miserliness or failure to keep Lent, and parishioners’ complaints about his arrogance and incompetence. My own uneasiness with “Father Grump” grew from his angry impatience with the mistakes of altar boys, real or imagined. But before he finally retired, he inspired in me a deep faith in the Catholic Church. God grant you glory, great Father Grump!

Catholic Fire: Saint Rita of Cascia: patron of impossible causes.

One of my favorite Saints, Saint Rita of Cascia (1457 A.D.). Happy Feast Day to all you Rita’s out there!

The saint of the day for May 22 is Saint Rita of Cascia, religious,

patron of impossible, desperate causes and situations. She is also the

patron saint of abuse victims, difficult marriages, infertility,

parenthood, sterility, and widows.

Read more about her life here: http://catholicfire.blogspot.com/2015/05/saint-rita-of-cascia-patron-of.html

 

Santa Rita Cascia

Santa Rita Cascia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Saint Rita's tomb at Cascia basilica.

English: Saint Rita’s tomb at Cascia basilica. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Matt C. Abbott: Why I wrote Pope Francis about an exorcist – U.s. – News – Catholic Online.

Here’s an interesting article about belief in the devil. Yes, even the pope believes, do you?

Here’s one name I haven’t heard mentioned in regard to possible canonization, yet it seems he’d be a good candidate: Father William S. Bowdern, S.J. Father Bowdern, who was born in 1897 and died in 1983, was the chief exorcist in the 1949 exorcism of “Robbie,” the teenaged boy whose case inspired William Peter Blatty’s 1971 novel The Exorcist, which subsequently was made into a feature film. The exorcism of “Robbie” took place largely in St. Louis, Mo.

Read more here: http://www.catholic.org/news/national/story.php?id=60611